Divorce in Colorado

Colorado may be nicknamed the “colorful Colorado” for its magnificent scenery, but this might not be the case when faced with a divorce petition.

The State of Colorado refers to divorce as “dissolution of marriage.” Colorado’s divorce residency criterion is 91 days. Either you or your spouse must have lived in the state for this period before filing for the divorce.1

Colorado is exclusively a no-fault divorce state, meaning the court will not assign fault on either party. The judge will grant you a divorce of legal separation if he/she finds the marriage to be irretrievably broken.2 Notably, Colorado divorce laws don’t support traditional at-fault grounds. Alimony may be granted once the judge looks at various factors before deciding whether or not to order maintenance.3

Colorado is an equitable distribution property state, and property acquired or increased during the marriage is subject to equitable division. The division isn’t done equally but in a manner that leads to a fair or equitable result for each spouse.4

1Colo. Rev. Stat. § 14-10-106 (1)(a)(I)

2Colo. Rev. Stat. § 14-10-106 (1)(a)(II)

3Colo. Rev. Stat. § 14-10-114(3)(a)(I)

4Colo. Rev. Stat. § 14-10-113