Divorce in Kentucky

Kentucky is nicknamed the Bluegrass State but can also take on the namesake The Dark and Bloody Ground if facing a hostile ex. Divorce in Kentucky is known as Divorce from the Bond of Matrimony.

To file for divorce in Kentucky, one of the parties must reside in the state (including being stationed in Kentucky as a member of the armed service) at the time of the divorce decree, and at least 180 days before filing the divorce petition.1

Kentucky is a no-fault state. Kentucky divorce laws only recognize one ground for divorce, which is the irretrievable breakdown of the marriage. The judge will grant the divorce if both spouses state that the marriage is irretrievably broken or whether one spouse states so and the other doesn’t deny it. If one spouse, however, denies that the marriage is irretrievably broken, the judge will consider other factors.2

Kentucky is an equitable distribution property state, and only property acquired during the marriage is subject to division following divorce. The Kentucky court attempts to distribute marital property in a manner believed to be equitable and fair. During the property division case, the judge will consider non-monetary contributions.3

1KRS § 403.140

2KRS § 403.170(1)

3KRS § 403.190